The New een

Dictionary of New Ie oh na

Theology Vol.1

Colin Brown

Editor:

THE NEW INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY OF NEW TESTAMENT THEOLOGY is a unique source of information, invaluable to ministers, teachers, and anyone interested in the study as well as

the teaching of the Bible. Some of its main features are:

@ Concise discussion of the major theological terms of the Bible

® Arranged in English alphabetical order; does not demand prior knowledge of Greek or Hebrew

@ Discusses the use of each key word in classical and secular Greek, the Old Testament and Rabbinic writings, the New Testament usage and reference

® English edition based on Theologisches Begriffslexikon zum Neuen Testament, extensively revised and enlarged

® Glossary of Technical Terms giving concise definitions of specialist expressions and usage in Vol. 1

® Index of Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and theological subjects (Vol. 1 and 2 separately indexed, Combined Index to all three Vols. in Vol. 3)

@ Full and up-to-date bibliographies

@ International team of contributors

The New

International Dictionary of New Testament

Theology

The New

International Dictionary of

Companion Volume

THE ame INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH |

Volume I[: A-F

New lestament

Theology

Colin Brown GENERAL EDITOR

Translated, with additions and revisions, from the German THEOLOGISCHES BEGRIFFSLEXIKON ZUM NEUEN TESTAMENT

Edited by Lothar Coenen, Erich Beyreuther and Hans Bietenhard

Regen exo a

from Zondervan Publishing House 1415 Lake Drive, S.E., Grand Rapids, Michigan 49506

THE NEw INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY OF NEw TESTAMENT THEOLOGY Originally published in German under the title, THEOLOGISCHES BEGRIFFSLEXIKON ZUM NEUEN TESTAMENT

© 1967, 1969, 1971 by Theologischer Verlag Rolf Brockhaus, Wuppertal. English Language edition copyright © 1975, The Zondervan Corporation Grand Rapids, Michigan, U.S.A. and The Paternoster Press, Ltd. Exeter, Devon, U.K.

All rights in this work are reserved by the publishers, and no part may be reproduced without wnitten permission, except for brief quotations in reviews.

Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data Main entry under title:

The new international dictionary of New Testament theology.

“Translated, with additions and. revisions, from the. German Theologisches Begriffslexikon zum Neuen Testament, edited by Lothar Coenen, Erich Beyreuther and Hans Bietenhard.”

“Companion volume: The new international dictionary of the Christian Church.”

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

1. Bible. N.T.—Theology—Dictionaries. 2. Bible. N.T.—Dictionaries. I. Brown, Colin.

BS2397.N48 230’ .03 75-38895

ISBN 0-310-21890-X Printed in the United States of America

84 85 86 87 88—10 9

Contents

PREFACE . . ; . ; : : 7 INTRODUCTION . ; , : ; 9 TABLE OF ARTICLES IN VOLUMEI . , 15 CONTRIBUTORS TO VOLUMEI . , . 25 ABBREVIATIONS. : ; ; , : 31 TRANSLITERATION ; , 47 GLOSSARY OF TECHNICAL TERMS ; . , ; 49 ARTICLES ; ; ; 73 INDEXES ; . . 745

HEBREW AND ARAMAIC WORDS _. ; : ; . 747

GREEK WORDS ; : : : . 751

GENERAL INDEX : , . 7162

ADDENDA . . . : : : P ; . . . 822

Preface

improbable-sounding piece of advice of the late Sir Edwyn Hoskyns contains

a wisdom born of experience. At first sight a dictionary may appear to contain nothing but a mass of antiquarian information. But to those who know where and how to look, the forbidding mass of material is not a barrier between the individual and real life but a bridge to a richer appreciation of it. It is when we ask, ‘“‘What is the writer getting at?’’, ““Why did he say this?”’, “Why did he put it like that?’’, ““What lies behind that remark?’’, that we begin to see things in a new light.

A theological dictionary is not a collection of prepackaged sermons or an anthology of predigested devotion. It is more like an invitation to join in the collective enterprise of quarrying and building. (The picture itself is not without affinities with the apostle Paul’s picture in 1 Cor. 3:10 ff. of Christian work as a collective building enterprise.) It is as one quarries among the mass of data and tries to build something out of it that the data become alive. What was perhaps previously flat and featureless takes on new perspective and meaning. One can go even further. The great revivals of the Christian church have come about when some individual here and there has been grasped by something that his predecessors and contemporaries have taken for granted without stopping to ask why it should be so. Perhaps the greatest need for the church in the last quarter of the twentieth century is for men to stop, to ask themselves this question as they study the Bible, and then to translate their answers into action.

Two things characterise this enterprise. On the one hand, one has to do it for oneself. There is no substitute for individual initiative. On the other hand, it is a co-operative endeavour. One cannot do without the work of others in unearthing facts and bringing to light insights which would otherwise be lost. But paradoxic- ally enough, it is only when others have done this kind of work that one can see the truth in it for oneself.

At all its stages The New International Dictionary of New Testament Theology is a collective enterprise. The original German work on which it is based was the product of ten years of teamwork, shared by university professors, college lecturers and others engaged in various branches of teaching and pastoral work. The extensive new material which will be included in all three volumes is the work of scholars on both sides of the Atlantic. The draft translation was prepared by a team of translators which included Professor G. H. Boobyer, the Rev. Dr. Colin Brown, Mr. H. L. Ellison, the Rev. M. C. Freeman, the late Rev. Dr. George Ogg, Mr. John D. Manton, the Rev. Philip J. Seddon, the Rev. David Sharp and Dr. A. J. M. Wedderburn.

Bua YOURSELF IN A DICTIONARY AND COME UP IN THE PRESENCE OF GOD. THIS

7

PREFACE

A special debt of gratitude is owed to Professor F. F. Bruce, Rylands Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis in the University of Manchester. Professor Bruce has read the articles in both typescript and proof, and has made many valuable comments and suggestions. Thanks are also due to the Rev. A. C. Thiselton of the Department of Biblical Studies in the University of Sheffield for reading the biblio- graphies and making numerous suggestions. The bibliographies have also benefited from the comments of his colleagues at Sheffield, Mr. D. J. A. Clines and the Rev. Wesley Carr. Mr. Michael Sadgrove has shouldered the heavy burden of proof- reading in the course of his doctoral studies at Oxford. The indexes have been compiled by the Rev. Norman Hillyer whose vigilant scholarship has also con- tributed to the correction of the proofs.

Finally, the editor would like to record his appreciation of the happy co-operation at all stages of the work with the editor of the German edition, Dr. Lothar Coenen, and the German publishers, the Theologischer Verlag Rolf Brockhaus of Wuppertal and for their kind agreement to the features incorporated in the English edition.

Scripture quotations in this Dictionary from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible are used by permission of the owners of the copyright, the Department of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America.

In the 1980 reprint of this volume the opportunity has been taken to make a number of minor corrections and to include bibliographical Addenda (see p.822).

Introduction

Neuen Testament has established itself as a standard work of reference among theologians, ministers, students and all who are concerned with a closer understanding of the teaching of the Bible. It offers its readers a concise discussion of the meaning and use of the key terms of the New Testament against their background in the ancient world and the Old Testament, combining an awareness of the progress of modern scholarship with a sensitivity to the message of Scripture. The work had its origin in a double conviction. On the one hand, theology at its deepest level is concerned with the revelation of God —the God who has revealed himself in Scripture. On the other hand, this revelation came to man over a period of many hundreds of years. It was expressed in ancient languages, employing the thought-forms of bygone civilizations. In order to understand the meaning and significance of Scripture, it is necessary to understand the meaning and use of its language against the background of its history and social structures. Some fifty years ago Karl Barth compared Calvin as an interpreter with the exegetes of his own day in the following terms:

Se ITS FIRST APPEARANCE IN 1965 THE Theologisches Begriffslexikon zum

How energetically Calvin, having first established what stands in the text, sets himself to re-think the whole material and to wrestle with it, till the walls which separate the sixteenth century from the first become transparent! Paul speaks, and the man of the sixteenth century hears. The conversation between the original record and the reader moves round the subject-matter, until a distinction between yesterday and to-day becomes impossible. If a man persuades himself that Calvin’s method can be dismissed with the old-fashioned motto, ““The Compul- sion of Inspiration,” he betrays himself as one who has never worked upon the interpretation of Scripture (The Epistle to the Romans, ET 1933, 7).

Whether Calvin, Barth (or, for that matter, anyone else) consistently attained this ideal is less important than the points that Barth makes. The goal of biblical study like that of expository preaching is an understanding of the text which enables its message to speak directly to the reader or hearer in his contemporary situation. In this process there are two main stages characterized by the terms exegesis and hermeneutics. The latter and it is on this that Barth focuses his attention —is concerned with reflecting on words and events from the past and interpreting their significance for us today. But before this may come about there must be the prior stage of exegesis, the elucidation of words, phrases, clauses and sentences, as their authors intended them to be understood and as they would have been understood by their original hearers. It is the exegesis of biblical terminology that is the primary concern of the present dictionary.

9

INTRODUCTION

In their fulfilment of this task the authors of the individual articles have en- deavoured not simply to analyse, classify and catalogue the most important words that occur in the New Testament. They have also sought to trace the meaning and use of words in secular Greek, the Septuagint and other versions of the Old Testa- ment used by the early church in the New Testament period, comparing them with the Hebrew of the Old Testament. They have also taken into account the use of words in the Dead Sea Scrolls and writers like Philo and Josephus. Finally, the New Testament writings themselves are examined individually in order to ascertain the precise shade of meaning which each work attaches to the words used.

In using a work of this kind there is always a danger of what James Barr has called “illegitimate totality transfer’ (The Semantics of Biblical Language, 1961, 218). This arises when the various meanings of a word in different contexts are run together and then presumed to be present on each and every occasion that the word is used. To quote Barr’s own example, the word ekklésia (church) may in various contexts mean “‘the Body of Christ,” “the first instalment of the Kingdom of God,” and “the Bride of Christ.”’ It would be illegitimate to presume without further indication that in any given passage the word ekklésia must bear all or even any of these meanings. To answer this question, one has to ask whether the author is acquainted with a particular meaning and whether the context indicates that this was his intention. Similarly, it is illegitimate to apply without more ado the meaning of a word in secular Greek or even the Septuagint to the New Testament, unless there be some indication that the word is used in the same sense.

Heed must also be given to Barr’s warnings about etymologies. To know the derivation of a word is no infallible guide to its meaning. Barr observes: ““The main point is that the etymology of a word is not a statement about its meaning but about its history; it is only as a historical statement that it can be responsibly asserted, and it is quite wrong to suppose that the etymology of a word is necessarily a guide either to its ‘proper’ meaning in a later period or to its actual meaning in that period”’ (op. cit., 109). Words have histories as well as etymologies. The mean- ing of any given word in any given context depends at least as much upon the place and use of the word in that context as upon any supposed derivation.

General Structure

The entire work is divided into articles under English titles, arranged in alphabetical order. These in turn contain one or more studies of the relevant terms in New Testament Greek which have been grouped under key words. Thus, the article on Baptism, Wash is divided into separate studies under the key Greek words baptizo, lou6 and nipto. For the sake of easy reference the key Greek word is placed in a box

at the head of the appropriate study thus: | BantiCa In each case

there follow the principal forms of the associated Greek words and their cognates which are given in both Greek letters and transliteration together with their basic dictionary equivalents.

Each article is divided into three main sections denoted by the letters CL indicat- ing discussion of the word in classical and secular Greek, OT in Old Testament usage, and NT dealing with New Testament usage. They are arranged as follows:

10

INTRODUCTION

CL Discussion of the word in secular Greek. Uses of the word are illustrated by

references to classical literature, inscriptions and papyri. But in view of the expressly theological interest of the dictionary discussion here is kept to a minimum.

oT Discussion of the word in the Old Testament. The language of the church of the New Testament era was Greek, and the Old Testament Scriptures used by the church were largely the Greek translation of the Hebrew known as the Septuagint (LXX). The discussion is therefore based on the terms as they occur in the LXX and other Greek versions. But throughout these are compared with the corresponding Hebrew words of the Hebrew Masoretic text. (On these terms see the Glossary of Technical Terms.) This second section also includes discussion of terms in rabbinic writers, Philo and Josephus, and the discoveries at Qumran. In some instances comparison with the New Testament reveals close affinity of thought; in others there is a wide gulf between it and other religious thought.

NT Discussion of the word in the New Testament, noting statistical occurrences of the word, its uses in relation to its background, and the specific emphases of individual writers and writings.

The same method of study is followed for each separate key Greek word, except occasionally where the word may not occur or be relevant in either secular Greek (as in the case of certain proper names) or the Old Testament. Bibliographies are appended to all major articles.

Scope

The dictionary is expressly theological in intention. Historical, geographical and archaeological information, appropriate in a general dictionary of the Bible, is here included only in so far as it is theologically relevant. The main emphasis falls on the elucidation of terms. For this reason the dictionary does not attempt to summarize the theology of Paul, John, or the Synoptic Gospels, or to trace influences upon individual writers as subjects in themselves. Nevertheless, attention is paid to the distinctive outlook of any given writer in relation to particular terms. A number of proper names have been included in so far as they have a special theological significance in the New Testament. |

Transliteration

The dictionary is designed for use both by the student of Greek and by those who have no prior grounding in ancient languages. For this reason all Greek and Hebrew words are given in transliteration. Greek words are given in Greek letters with the appropriate transliteration and translation at the head of each key Greek word. Thereafter only the transliterations are given. Hebrew words are given in transliteration only. A key to the transliterations is given on p. 47.

Features of the English Edition

The translation has been edited to meet the needs of English readers. This has involved a certain amount of re-writing and re-phrasing for the sake of clarity. The

11

INTRODUCTION

relative merits of different translations of Biblical passages have been discussed in English instead of German versions, and quotations have been taken from the English translations of published works. Where appropriate, references to import- ant works relating to matters under discussion have been inserted.

A major difference that will be immediately apparent to those who compare the present work with the German original is the complete reorganization of the order of the articles. The German original had its articles arranged according to the alphabetical order of the German titles. Each article has been given an English title set in alphabetical order. This means that the present volume contains articles from all three volumes of the German original, and also that articles which appeared in the first volume of the German are distributed throughout all three volumes of the English edition. In assigning titles to the articles, it was decided not to restrict the title to a single key word, but to include in it those words which would indicate the general contents of the article concerned.

This English edition contains some 70 major articles which did not appear in the original German version. Other articles have been extended to include important new sections and other material which likewise have not previously been published. The Glossary of Technical Terms has been extensively enlarged. As the work proceeds, it is the publishers’ intention to include further new material which is being prepared for inclusion in the new revised German edition.

The bibliographies appended to each article have been extensively revised and enlarged. The majority are divided into two sections. The first contains a list of books and articles in English, including translations of works listed in the original German bibliography. The second section is devoted to works in other languages. This contains titles listed in the original bibliography and also other works, including important works published since the article was written. The purpose is twofold. On the one hand, it offers English readers a conspectus of relevant litera- ture in English. By separating the two sections, they will be able to see at a glance which works are relevant to their particular needs. On the other hand, it was decided to include titles not available in English translation in order to meet the needs of the more specialist student.

Certain articles in the German original contained homiletical sections which were directed to the pastoral situation in Germany and on the continent of Europe. They included references to discussions and literature which were significant in a continental setting but which are less so outside that context. In view of the different situation in the English-speaking world, it was decided with the agreement of the German publishers not to include these sections in the present edition.

Biblical References

Quotations from the Bible in English have normally been taken from the Revised Standard Version which is quoted by kind permission of the Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. However, translations of other versions are also given at certain points where the sources are specifically stated. In certain Old Testament passages where the LXX reference differs from that of the Hebrew Masoretic Text and the English versions the variant reference is given in brackets.

12

INTRODUCTION

Statistical and Lexical Information

Statistical and lexical information has been drawn from the following sources: R. Morgenthaler, Statistik des neutestamentlichen Wortschatzes, 1958; E. Hatch and H. A. Redpath, A Concordance to the Septuagint and the Other Greek Versions of the Old Testament, I-III, (1897) 1954; K. G. Kuhn, Konkordanz zu den Qumrantexten, 1960; W. F. Moulton and A. S. Geden, A Concordance to the Greek Testament, (1897) 19634; A. Schmdller, Handkonkordanz zum griechischen Neuen Testament, 196814; S. Mandelkern, Veteris Testamenti Concordantiae, I-II, (1896) 1955; F. Brown, S. R. Driver and C. A. Briggs, A Hebrew-English Lexicon of the Old Testament, with an Appendix containing the Biblical Aramaic, (1907) 1955; L. Koehler and W. Baumgartner, Lexicon in Veteris Testamenti Libros, 19587; H. G. Liddell and R. Scott, A Greek-English Lexicon revised by H. S. Jones, 1940°; and W: F. Arndt and F. W. Gingrich, A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature, 1957.

Indexes

Separate indexes are provided to Volumes I and II, and indexes to the complete work in Volume III. A great many words are dealt with which are not included under the main headings in the Table of Articles, so the indexes should be con- sulted for full details.

13

Table of Articles in Volume I

TITLE

Abolish, Nullify, Reject

Abomination of Desolation

Abraham, Sarah, Hagar, Isaac

Accuser, Accuse

Adam, Eve

Advocate, Paraclete, Helper

Age, Stature, Maturity Akeldama

All Many

Amen, Hallelujah, Hosanna

Angel, Messenger, Gabriel, Michael

Anger, Wrath

KryY GREEK WORDS

Katapyéew adetéw éEovGevéw

to BoéAvypa.

THC Epnudaews

" ABpadu L appa. “Ayap ’Ioaar

KATH YOPOG EYKAAED

"Addu Ebda

MAapaKANTOC

nAixkia ’"Axerdapax MGC

modhoi aunyv

aAAniovia wMoavva

dyyedoc TaBpini Mixzand

Ovpoc opyn

katargeo atheteo exoutheneo

to bdelygma tes eremoseos

Abraam Sarra Hagar Isaak

katégoros enkaleo

Adam Heua

parakleétos

hélikia Akeldamach

pas polloi

amen hallélouia hésanna

angelos Gabrieél Michael

thymos orgeé

AUTHOR

J. I. Packer

G. R. Beasley- Murray

H. Seebass P. J. Budd P. J. Budd P. J. Budd

H. Bietenhard J. I. Packer

H. Seebass C. Brown

G. Braumann

R. Schippers J. A. Motyer

F. Graber

H. Bietenhard J. A. Motyer J. A. Motyer

H. Bietenhard P. J. Budd P. J. Budd

H. Schonweiss H. C. Hahn

TABLE OF ARTICLES

Animal

Anoint

Antichrist

Apostle

Avarice, Greed, Love of Money

Babylon

Bag, Box

Baptism, Wash

Beat, Chastise, Scourge

Beginning, Origin, Rule, Ruler, Originator

Belly, Stomach Bethlehem

Bind

Bird

Birth, Beget, Bear,

Become, Miscarriage, Regeneration, Well-born,

Illegitimate

16

Onptov Animals in the NT

aheipo xpioo QVTLX PIOTOG

anoaotéAAw

mdAéovecia gpidapyupia

Bafviadv

Baddavtiov yAWOCOKOMOV 1Hpa

BantiCa Aob@ ViINTO

Infant Baptism: its

thérion

aleipho chrio

antichristos

apostello

pleonexia philargyria

Babylon

ballantion glossokomon pera

baptizo loud nipto

Background and Theology

Maotlyom@

apxy

Koidia BnOéeu

OEM

TLETELVOV

YEVVaM@ VIVOLLAI EKTPOUG

madiyyevecia TIKTO

EDYEVHC

mastigoo

arché

koilia Béthleem

deo

peteinon

gennao ginomai ektroma

palingenesia tikto eugenes

W. Bauder C. Brown

W. Brunotte D. Miiller E. Kauder E. von Eicken, H. Lindner, D. Miiller,

C. Brown

F. Selter

G. Finkenrath H. Seebass

G

. T. D. Angel

G. R. Beasley- Murray

R. T. Beckwith M. Embry

H. Bietenhard

S. Wibbing P. J. Budd

W. von Meding, D. Miiller

C. Brown

A. Ringwald J. Guhrt

H. Miiller, C. Brown

J. Guhrt

G. Bauer

J. A. Motyer

113 114

161

164

Bishop, Presbyter, Elder

Bitter

Black, White, Red

Blessing, Blessed, Happy

Blind Blood,

Sprinkle, Strangled

Boast Body, Member,

Limb

Book, Read, Letter

Bread, Daily, Manna

Broad, Wide Brother, Neighbour,

Friend

Burden,

Heavy,

Labour

Bury, Grave, Tomb Busybody, Meddle

Buy, Sell, Market

ETIOKOTLOG mpEoBotEpos TMIK POG

71K pia.

TIK paiva maparik paiva

MELAS AEVKOG MUPPOG evdoyia pakdploc

TOPAOG

aiua pavtila@

MVIKTOC KabxnUa.

HEAOG oMua

Parts of the Body

BiBdos avaylv@oKw eM1aTOAH

aptoc ETMLOUT LOC pavva MAGTOG adeApoc 0 mAnatov ETAIPOC Bdpos

KONOG

danta TEplepyacoual

ayopala MMDAED

episkopos presbyteros pikros pikria pikraino parapikrainé

melas leukos pyrros

eulogia makarios typhlos

haima rhantizo

pniktos kauchéma melos

soma

biblos anaginosko epistolé

artos epiousios manna platos adelphos ho plesion hetairos baros kopos thapto

periergazomai

agorazo poleo

TABLE OF ARTICLES

L. Coenen L. Coenen

G. T. D. Angel

G. T. D. Angel

H.-G. Link U. Becker

F. Graber

F. Laubach G. R. Beasley- Murray

H. Bietenhard

H. C. Hahn H.-G. Schiitz S. Wibbing

J. A. Motyer U. Becker

J. Blunck

G. Finkenrath F. Merkel

W. Mundle F. Merkel

G. T. D. Angel W. Giinther U. Falkenroth D. A. Carson W. Mundle M. Seitz, H.-G. Link

C. J. Hemer D. H. Field

D. H. Field

188 192

201 202 202 202

203 204 205 206 215 218

220

TABLE OF ARTICLES

Caesar, Consul, Governor Call

Care, Anxiety

Carpenter, Builder, Workman, Craftsman,

Trade Cherub Child, Boy,

Servant, Son, Adoption

Church, Synagogue

Circumcision Clothe, Naked, Dress, Garment,

Cloth

Cold, Hot, Lukewarm

Come

Comfort, Encouragement

Command, Order

Conceive, Apprehend

Confess

Conscience

18

Kaioap NYELOOV bmatoc Kadéw

Lépyuva

TEKTOOV

xepovp

VAIO maic

TEKVOV vIOC

ExkAnoia

TMEPITEUVO YULVOG Ob@ [uUaTIOV WOXPOC épxoual KATaVTaM

HEAAw

bapoéw rapapvOéopat Ooyua

évtoAn nrapayyeAA@ KEAEvw@

ovAAauBavw

OpohoyEem

aovvelOna ic

Kaisar hégemon hypatos kaleo

merimna

tekton

cheroub

népios pais

teknon hyios

ekklésia

peritemno gymnos dyo himation

psychros

erchomai katantaod mello

tharseo paramytheomai

dogma entolé parangellé keleud

syllambano

homologed

syneidésis

J. D. G. Dunn

L. Coenen J. Goetzmann

J. I. Packer

J. G. Baldwin

G. Braumann G. Braumann, C. Brown G. Braumann G. Braumann, C. Brown

L. Coenen

H. C. Hahn

H. Weigelt

C. J. Hemer

W. Mundle W. Mundle W. Schneider

W. Mundle G. Braumann

H. H. Esser H. H. Esser W. Mundle P. J. Budd

D. H. Field

D. Fiirst

H. C. Hahn, C. Brown

344

348

Conversion, Penitence, Repentence, Proselyte

Council, Sanhedrin

Courage, Boldness

Covenant, Guarantee, Mediator

Creation, Foundation, Creature, Maker

Cross, Wood, Tree

Crown, Sceptre, Rod

Cry

Cunning

Curse, Insult, Fool

Danger, Risk, Peril

Darkness, Night

David

Deaf, Dumb

ETM IOTPEQ petapéAoual petavola MpOOHAvTOG

ovuBovdevw ovvédp lov

TOAUGW

d1adnkn Eyyvoc [MEOItNC KkatapodAn

KTIOIC Onuiodpyos

EdAov OTAVPOG

OTEPAVOG paBdos

Kpacw Boaw mavoupyia avadeya KakoAoyew Katapaoual paka

Kivovved@ HAAETNOC

vv0e OKOTOG

Aavid

K@@OC

epistrepho metamelomai metanoia prosélytos

symbouleud synedrion

tolmaod

diathéké engyos mesités katabolé ktisis démiourgos

xylon stauros

stephanos rhabdos

krazo boao panourgia anathema

kakologeo kataraomai rhaka

kindyneud chalepos

nyx skotos

Dauid

kophos

TABLE OF ARTICLES

F. Laubach F. Laubach J. Goetzmann U. Becker

I. H. Marshall

J. A. Motyer

J. Guhrt O. Becker O. Becker

H. H. Esser H. H. Esser I. H. Marshall

B. Siede

E. Brandenburger,

C. Brown

C. J. Hemer

D. A. Carson C. Brown

D. A. Carson

H. Aust, D. Miller W. Mundle W. Mundle T. Sorg

P. J. Budd

H. C. Hahn

J. A. Motyer

P. J. Budd

TABLE OF ARTICLES

Death, Kill, Sleep

Defile

Demon, Air, Cast Out

Deny

Desire, Lust, Pleasure

Despise

Destroy, Perish, Ruin

Determine, Appoint, Present

Dirt, Filth, Refuse

Disciple, Follow, Imitate, After

Discipline, Prudence, Immorality, Prostitute

20

GNoKtElv@ Odvatoc KaGevdow VEK POG

paiva Lodbva, LOAvG LOG

anp OGlULOVvIoV ExBadrw

apvéopual

én 1Ovpia noovn Opéyoual

Katagppovew OAIyWpEW

anata OhEOpos

P0cipa é€aleipw

Kabiotnul opil@ MAapiotH ul mpoyxetpil@ tAdooW tiOnul mpoGeoLia HEIPOTOVEW Aayxavo

mEpiy nua, mtEpikabapya pvmoc oKvBadov KOTpIoV

aKkodov0éw Labythc MIpéopal oniow

éyK patela TOpVvEevw owdpoabvy

apokteino thanatos katheudo nekros

miaino molyno, molysmos

aer daimonion ekballé

arneomali

epithymia hédoné oregomai

kataphroneo oligéreo

apoleia olethros

phtheiro exaleipho

kathistémi horizo paristémi procheirizo tasso tithemi prothesmia cheirotoneo lanchano

peripséma,

perikatharma

rhypos skybalon koprion

akoloutheo mathétés mimeomai opiso

enkrateia porneuo sophrosyné

L. Coenen

W. Schmithals

L. Coenen L. Coenen

J. I. Packer

H. Bietenhard

H.-G. Link, E. Tiedtke

H. Schonweiss E. Beyreuther

J. Guhrt J. I. Packer

H. C. Hahn H. C. Hahn, C. Brown F. Merkel J. I. Packer

S. Wibbing G. Dulon

K. Munzer P. Schmidt J. I. Packer J. I. Packer J. I. Packer J. I. Packer J. I. Packer

J. I. Packer

C. Blendinger

D. Miiller W. Bauder W. Bauder

H. Baltensweiler

H. Reisser S. Wibbing

Distinguish, Doubt

Divorce Dragon, Serpent, Scorpion, Sting

Dream

Drunken, Sober

Dry Up, Wither

Earth,

Land, World

Ecstasy,

Astonishment,

Distraction, Horror, Madness

Egypt, Egyptian

Elect, Choose

Elijah

Empty, Vain

Enemy, Enmity, Hate

Envy Escape, Flee

Eunuch

OlaKpivw

GNMOoTad lov

Opaka@v OPIC oKopnioc KEVTpov ovap

peOb@ vyeo Enpaivw 1] OIKOvMEVN aypoc xov¢ KOGLLOG EKOTAGIC

paivoual ExTAHCOW

Aiyvntoc aipéoual EKAEYOUAI *Hiiac

KEVOG

MATALOC EXOPOG MidEw p0oved pEevyo

ebvooxOC

diakrino

apostasion drakon ophis skorpios kentron

onar

methyo nepho

xéraino

ge

oikoumené

agros chous kosmos ekstasis

mainomai ekplésso

Aigyptos haireomai eklegomai Hélias

kenos

mataios echthros miseo phthoneo pheugo

eunouchos

TABLE OF ARTICLES

B. Gartner

I. H. Marshall H. Bietenhard H. Bietenhard P. J. Budd P. J. Budd P. J. Budd

P. J. Budd

P. J. Budd

orgenthaler ender . Field

mm

J. Schattenmann D. H. Field

K. A. Kitchen

G. Nordholt L. Coenen

H. Bietenhard E. Tiedtke, H.-G. Link, C. Brown

E. Tiedtke

H. Bietenhard H. Seebass D. H. Field D. A. Carson

M. Baltensweiler

503

TABLE OF ARTICLES

Evil, Bad, Wickedness

Exhort, Warn, Console, Rebuke

Explain, Interpret, Tell, Narrative

Face

Faith, Persuade, Belief, Unbelief

Fall, Fall Away

Fast

Father

Fear, Awe

Feast, Passover

Fellowship, Have, Share, Participate

Fight, Prize, Triumph, Victory

Fire, Burn

Firm, Foundation, Certainty, Confirm

First, Firstborn

ZZ

KQKOC TMOVNPOG

vov@eté@ TMApAaKarewM ETTIT IAW

E€nyéoual Em 1Ab@ EpLLNVED@ TPOG@TMOV

mEtGoual MIOTIC

agiotnul TMINTW

VNOTEDM appa TATHP

poBoc

EOPTH MaoxXa

EXO KOWOovIA

ayoy BpaBeiov O@piaupebm

VIKAaW@

Kadua nop BéBatoc BepéA1oc

acgareia KvpO@

TP@TOC

TPWTOTOKOG

kakos poneros

noutheted parakaleo epitimad

exégeomai epilyo

herméneuod

prosopon peithomai pistis aphistémi pipto nesteuo

abba pater

phobos

heorté pascha

echo koinonia

agon brabeion thriambeud

nikao

kauma pyr

bebaios themelios asphaleia kyroo

protos prototokos

E. Achilles

F. Selter G. Braumann G. T. D. Angel

A. C. Thiselton

E. Tiedtke O. Becker O. Michel

W. Bauder

F. S. Rothenberg

O. Hofius

W. Mundle

R. Mayer B. Schaller

J. Eichler J. Schattenmann

A. Ringwald A. Ringwald K. Dahn, H.-G. Link W. Giinther

S. Solle H. Bietenhard

H. Schonweiss J. Blunck

C. Brown

J. I. Packer

K. H. Bartels

Fish

Flesh

Flow

Foreign, Alien, Dispersion, Stranger

Foreknowledge,

Providence, Predestination

Forgiveness

Form, Substance

Freedom Fruit, Fig, Thorn,

Thistle

Make Room, Give Way

adAotploc Olaonopa. Eévoc TAPETIONMOG MAPOIKOG

Tpoyiv@akw@ TLPOVOEM

7 poopaw poo pila TpotiOnul

aginul

Eld0c open oxnua UMOOTAGIC

Edevbepia

KQpTlOoc OUKH tpipodoc aKkodoy adxavéa

MEP lOdEvW tAHOos mAnpOw@ XMPEW VEUD yoptalaw

ichthys

Sarx

rhed

allotrios diaspora xenos parepidémos paroikos

proginosko pronoeo prohorao prohorizo protithémi

aphiémi

eidos morphé schéma hypostasis

eleutheria

karpos syké tribolos skolops akantha

perisseuo pléthos pléroo choreo gemo chortazo

TABLE OF ARTICLES

J. A. Motyer

. Seebass,

. A. Carson

. Bietenhard . Bietenhard . Bietenhard . Bietenhard

Jacobs, . Krienke

oe eee ae oe eo

. Vorlander

H

G. Braumann G. Braumann G. Braumann G. Harder

J. Blunck

R. Hensel J. A. Motyer J. A. Motyer C. Brown J. A. Motyer

T. Brandt

W. Bauder R. Schippers P. Schmidt

J. G. Baldwin J. G. Baldwin

C. Thiselton

S. Rothenberg

670

671

682

23

Contributors

Editors and Advisors Editor of the English edition . . . Colin Brown General Editor of the German edition Lothar Coenen

Greek philology, philosophy and

classical background ... . . . Gerhard Fries Old Testament and estuaeiat . . . Horst Seebass Qumran... ...... . Reinhard Deichgraber Rabbinics .. . . . Hans Bietenhard

New Testament sHidloey anh theology Hans Bietenhard

Church history and historical theology . . . . . . Erich Beyreuther

Bibliographical sonsileant to the German edition . . . . Werner Georg Kiimmel

Contributors to Volume I

In the following list the author’s work is denoted by the Greek words which follow the title.

Ernst Achilles, Superintendent, Gottingen Evil, kakos, ponéros

Gervais T. D. Angel, M.A., M.Ed., Dean of Studies, Trinity College, Bristol Bag, Box, ballantion, glossokomon, péra; Bitter, pikros, pikraind, parapikraino; Black, White, Red, melas, leukos, pyrros; Broad, Wide, platos; Exhort, Warn, ‘Console, Rebuke, epitimad

Hugo Aust, Steinfeld Curse, Insult, Fool, anathema (part)

Joyce G. Baldwin, B.A., B.D., Dean of Women, Trinity College, Bristol Cherub, cheroub; Fullness, Abound, Multitude, Fulfil, Make Room, Give Way, gemo, chortazo

Heinrich Baltensweiler, Dr. theol., Professor, Basel Discipline, Prudence, Immorality, Prostitute, enkrateia; Eunuch, eunouchos

Karl Heinz Bartels,